In the News

Key Excerpts:

"Budget Chairwoman Patty Murray, D-Wash., said she wants to see revenue from eliminating tax preferences go toward higher spending on infrastructure.'There are members on both sides of the aisle who would like to eliminate wasteful expenditures in our tax code — House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp recently released a new House Republican tax reform proposal that would get rid of many of them,' Murray said. 'There’s no reason we shouldn’t be able to work together.'"
Key Excerpts:

"Last week, the deal sailed through the House and, on Wednesday, it easily passed the Senate, 64 to 36. Nine Republicans joined all 55 members of the Senate Democratic caucus in voting yes. Murray stood in the well of the chamber as the vote unfolded, accepting pats on the back from colleagues in both parties. 'The American people are sick and tired of the constant crises we’ve seen here in D.C. over the past few years,' Murray said on the Senate floor. 'I am hopeful this deal can be a foundation for continued bipartisan work, because we have so many big challenges we need to tackle for the families and communities we represent.'”
Key Excerpts:

"Something odd happened here on Tuesday. The Senate advanced a two-year bipartisan budget deal that will now surely be sent to the president for his signature later this week without waiting for a cliff, a chasm, a deadline or a shutdown to force its hand. Just like that, declarations sounded in Washington that the city almost seemed to be working again."
Key Excerpts:

"The deal's negotiators, House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and Senate Budget Chairwoman Patty Murray, D-Wash., said they are hopeful this final act of bipartisanship will usher in a new era of cooperation in a divided Washington."
Key Excerpts:

"The Senate voted Tuesday to advance a bipartisan two-year budget deal – a move that puts Capitol Hill one step closer to a thaw in the fiscal wars that have paralyzed Washington. The chamber agreed 67-33 to cut off debate on the budget agreement reached by Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) last week. Final passage is virtually guaranteed now and a vote is slated for no later than Wednesday. 'This deal is a compromise. It doesn’t tackle every one of the challenges we face as a nation, but that was never our goal,' Murray said. 'This bipartisan bill takes the first steps toward rebuilding our broken budget process and hopefully, toward rebuilding our broken Congress.'”
Key Excerpts:

"That Congress could soon pass a budget agreement after months of relentless partisan showdowns is thanks in large part to a mom in tennis shoes. Sen. Patty Murray presented herself in that ordinary way when she first ran as a Democrat to represent Washington state, and skeptics questioned her political savvy — and footwear. In the two decades since that long-shot campaign, the petite, no-nonsense lawmaker has quietly ascended to the top levels of Senate power. As chairwoman of the Budget Committee, Murray negotiated a breakthrough $85-billion accord in one-on-one talks with Rep. Paul D. Ryan, the former GOP vice presidential contender from Wisconsin who is known for his austere approach to the federal budget."
Key Excerpts:

"President Barack Obama was on the phone repeatedly with Sen. Patty Murray during the high-stakes budget talks and asked how he could help. Murray’s response: I got this. The veteran Washington Democrat, who chairs the Senate Budget Committee, had quietly and methodically built a close relationship with a man long vilified by the White House and congressional Democrats: Paul Ryan, the Wisconsin Republican and Mitt Romney’s running mate. But after private negotiations with each other, starting in the Senate dining room exactly a year ago and culminating after Murray’s tense talks with furious House Democrats, the two were able to do what seemed impossible in a gridlocked Congress: Reach a bipartisan budget accord."
Key Excerpts:

"A breakthrough budget deal that avoids a government shutdown in January and blunts automatic spending cuts easily won passage in the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday, laying the groundwork for two years free of funding crises. The 332-94 bipartisan vote sends the measure to the Senate, which is expected to pass it next week despite the objections of conservative political groups that say it violates their core goal of cutting government spending."