Budget Blog

Sanders Amendment 474

Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect and strenghten the Department of Veterans Affiars, hire more health care professionals for the Department, and ensure quality and timely access to heatlh care for all veterans.

Passed by Voice Vote.

Sanders Amendment 323

Purpose: To create millions of middle class jobs by investing in our nation's infrastructure paid for by raising revenue through closing loopholes in the corporate and international tax system.

Failed, 45-52

Mikulski Amendment 362

Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral resrve fund relating to amending the Equal Pay Act of 1963 to allow for punitive damages, limit the any factor "other than sex" exception, and prohibit retaliation against employees who share salary information.

Failed 45-54.

Sanders-Wyden Amendment 386

Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect Medicaid beneficiaries from benefit cuts.

Passed 94-3

Mar 23 2015

Comparison of Chairman Enzi proposed FY 16 Budget Plan to revised version approved by Budget Committee on March 19th

Sanders and Democrat caucus intend to make revisions to Republican plan passed on party-line 12-10 vote

* 2 Title: Setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2016 and setting forth the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2017 through 2025.

Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring),

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016.

(a) Declaration.—Congress declares that this resolution is the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2016 and that this resolution sets forth the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2017 through 2025.

(b) Table of Contents.—The table of contents for this concurrent resolution is as follows:

Sec.1.Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2016.

TITLE I—RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

Sec.101.Recommended levels and amounts.

Sec.102.Social Security.

Sec.103.Postal Service discretionary administrative expenses.

Sec.104.Major functional categories.

TITLE II—RECONCILIATION

Sec.201.Reconciliation in the Senate.

TITLE III—RESERVE FUNDS

Sec.301.Spending-neutral reserve fund to increase the pace of economic growth and private sector job creation in the United States.

Sec.302.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to strengthen America’s priorities.

Sec.303.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect flexible and affordable healthcare choices for all.

Sec.304.Deficit-neutral reserve fund for improving access to the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

Sec.305.Deficit-neutral reserve fund for other health reforms.

Sec.306.Spending-neutral reserve fund for child welfare.

Sec.307.Deficit-neutral reserve fund for veterans and servicemembers.

Sec.308.Deficit-neutral reserve fund for tax reform and administration.

Sec.309.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to invest in the infrastructure in America.

Sec.310.Deficit-neutral reserve fund for air transportation.

Sec.311.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote jobs in the United States through international trade.

Sec.312.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase employment opportunities for disabled workers.

Sec.313.Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Higher Education Act reform.

Sec.314.Spending-neutral reserve fund for energy legislation.

Sec.315.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to reform environmental statutes.

Sec.316.Spending-neutral reserve fund for water resources legislation.

Sec.317.Spending-neutral reserve fund on mineral security and mineral rights.

Sec.318.Spending-neutral reserve fund to reform the abandoned mine lands program.

Sec.319.Spending-neutral reserve fund to improve forest health.

Sec.320.Spending-neutral reserve fund to reauthorize funding for payments in lieu of taxes to counties and other units of local government.

Sec.321.Spending-neutral reserve fund for financial regulatory system reform.

Sec.322.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve Federal program administration.

Sec.323.Spending-neutral reserve fund to implement agreements with freely associated states.

Sec.324.Spending-neutral reserve fund to protect payments to rural hospitals and create sustainable access for rural communities.

Sec.325.Spending-neutral reserve fund to encourage State medicaid demonstration programs to promote independent living and integrated work for the disabled.

Sec.326.Spending-neutral reserve fund to allow pharmacists to be paid for the provision of services under Medicare.

Sec.327.Spending-neutral reserve fund to improve our Nation’s community health centers.

Sec.328.Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to the funding of independent agencies, which may include subjecting the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to the regular appropriations process.

Sec.329.Deficit-neutral reserve fund for export promotion.

Sec.330.Spending-neutral reserve fund to reform, improve, and enhance 529 college savings plans.

Sec.331.Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to securing overseas diplomatic facilities of the United States.

Sec.332.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to achieve savings by helping struggling Americans on the road to personal and financial independence.

Sec.333.Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to conserving Federal land, enhancing access to Federal land for recreational opportunities, and making investments in counties and schools.

Sec.334.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect taxpayers from identity fraud.

Sec.335.Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to career and technical education.

Sec.336.Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to FEMA preparedness.

Sec.337.Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to expanding, enhancing, or otherwise improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Sec.338.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote the next generation of NIH researchers in the United States.

Sec.339.Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to promoting manufacturing in the United States.

Sec.340.Spending-neutral reserve fund to prohibit aliens without legal status in the United States from qualifying for a refundable tax credit.

Sec.341.Deficit-reduction reserve fund for report elimination or modification.

Sec.342.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to address heroin and prescription opioid abuse.

Sec.343.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to strengthen our Department of Defense civilian workforce.

Sec.344.Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Department of Defense reform.

Sec.345.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve Federal workforce development, job training, and reemployment programs.

Sec.346.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to provide energy assistance and invest in energy efficiency and conservation.

Sec.347.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to enable greater collaboration between the Department of Veterans Affairs and law school clinics serving veterans.

Sec.348.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase funding for Department of Energy nuclear waste cleanup.

Sec.349.Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to Department of Defense initiatives to bolster resilience of mission-critical department infrastructure to impacts from climate change and associated events.

Sec.350.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to end Operation Choke Point and protect the Second Amendment.

Sec.351.Deficit-neutral reserve fund to prevent the use of Federal funds for the bailout of improvident State and local governments.

TITLE IV—BUDGET PROCESS

Subtitle A—Budget Enforcement

Sec.401.Extension of enforcement of budgetary points of order in the Senate.

Sec.402.Senate point of order against legislation increasing long-term deficits.

Sec.403.Point of order against advance appropriations.

Sec.404.Supermajority enforcement of unfunded mandates.

Sec.405.Repeal of Senate point of order against certain reconciliation legislation.

Sec.406.Point of order against changes in mandatory programs.

Sec.407.Prohibition on agreeing to legislation without a score.

Sec.408.Protecting the savings in reported reconciliation bills.

Sec.409.Point of order against exceeding funds designated for overseas contingency operations.

Sec.410.Senate point of order against provisions of appropriations legislation that constitute changes in mandatory programs affecting the Crime Victims Fund.

Sec.411.Accuracy Sec.410.Accuracy in budget enforcement.

Sec.411.Fair Sec.412.Fair value estimates.

Sec.412.Honest Sec.413.Honest accounting estimates.

Sec.413.Currency modernization. Sec.414.Currency modernization.

Sec.414.Certain energy contracts. Sec.415.Certain energy contracts.

Sec.416.Long-term scoring.

Sec.417.Requiring clearer reporting of projected Federal spending and deficits.

Sec.418.Reporting on tax expenditures.

Sec.419.Congressional Budget Office estimates.

Sec.420.To require transparent reporting on the ongoing costs and savings to taxpayers of Obamacare.

Sec.421.Prohibiting the use of guarantee fees as an offset.

Subtitle B—Other Provisions

Sec.431.Oversight of Government performance.

Sec.432.Budgetary treatment of certain discretionary administrative expenses.

Sec.433.Application and effect of changes in allocations and aggregates.

Sec.434.Adjustments to reflect changes in concepts and definitions.

Sec.435.Exercise of rulemaking powers.

TITLE I—RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

SEC. 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of fiscal years 2016 through 2025:

(1) FEDERAL REVENUES.—For purposes of the enforcement of this resolution:

(A) The recommended levels of Federal revenues are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016: $_______,000,000 $2,666,755,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017: $_______,000,000 $2,763,328,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018: $_______,000,000 $2,858,131,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019: $_______,000,000 $2,974,147,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020: $_______,000,000 $3,099,410,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021: $_______,000,000 $3,241,963,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022: $_______,000,000 $3,388,688,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023: $_______,000,000 $3,550,388,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024: $_______,000,000 $3,722,144,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025: $_______,000,000 $3,905,648,000,000.

(B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels of Federal revenues should be changed are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016: $_______,000,000 $0.

Fiscal year 2017: $_______,000,000 $0.

Fiscal year 2018: $_______,000,000 $0.

Fiscal year 2019: $_______,000,000 $0.

Fiscal year 2020: $_______,000,000 $0.

Fiscal year 2021: $_______,000,000 $0.

Fiscal year 2022: $_______,000,000 $0.

Fiscal year 2023: $_______,000,000 $0.

Fiscal year 2024: $_______,000,000 $0.

Fiscal year 2025: $_______,000,000 $0.

(2) NEW BUDGET AUTHORITY.—For purposes of the enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels of total new budget authority are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016: $_______,000,000 $3,003,274,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017: $_______,000,000 $2,894,221,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018: $_______,000,000 $2,958,672,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019: $_______,000,000 $3,107,799,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020: $_______,000,000 $3,228,534,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021: $_______,000,000 $3,337,729,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022: $_______,000,000 $3,455,558,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023: $_______,000,000 $3,525,594,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024: $_______,000,000 $3,624,025,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025: $_______,000,000 $3,646,263,000,000.

(3) BUDGET OUTLAYS.—For purposes of the enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels of total budget outlays are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016: $_______,000,000 $3,037,267,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017: $_______,000,000 $2,928,317,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018: $_______,000,000 $2,945,067,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019: $_______,000,000 $3,080,929,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020: $_______,000,000 $3,185,512,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021: $_______,000,000 $3,308,296,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022: $_______,000,000 $3,449,532,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023: $_______,000,000 $3,497,247,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024: $_______,000,000 $3,576,890,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025: $_______,000,000 $3,614,976,000,000.

(4) DEFICITS.—For purposes of the enforcement of this resolution, the amounts of the deficits are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016: $_______,000,000 $370,512,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017: $_______,000,000 $164,989,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018: $_______,000,000 $86,936,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019: $_______,000,000 $106,782,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020: $_______,000,000 $86,102,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021: $_______,000,000 $66,333,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022: $_______,000,000 $60,844,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023: –$_______,000,000 $53,141,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024: –$_______,000,000 $145,254,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025: –$_______,000,000 $290,672,000,000.

(5) PUBLIC DEBT.—Pursuant to section 301(a)(5) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the appropriate levels of the public debt are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016: $_______,000,000 $19,009,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017: $_______,000,000 $19,396,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018: $_______,000,000 $19,718,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019: $_______,000,000 $20,055,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020: $_______,000,000 $20,375,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021: $_______,000,000 $20,676,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022: $_______,000,000 $21,008,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023: $_______,000,000 $21,195,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024: $_______,000,000 $21,254,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025: $_______,000,000 $21,207,000,000,000.

(6) DEBT HELD BY THE PUBLIC.—The appropriate levels of debt held by the public are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016: $_______,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017: $_______,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018: $_______,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019: $_______,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020: $_______,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021: $_______,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022: $_______,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023: $_______,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024: $_______,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025: $_______,000,000. $13,799,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017: $14,042,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018: $14,222,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019: $14,445,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020: $14,674,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021: $14,912,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022: $15,230,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023: $15,419,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024: $15,500,000,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025: $15,538,000,000,000.

(7) FEDERAL TAX EXPENDITURES.—The levels of Federal tax expenditures are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016: $1,481,800,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017: $1,593,500,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018: $1,670,800,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019: $1,738,019,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020: $1,810,158,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021: $1,890,648,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022: $1,973,922,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023: $2,064,520,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024: $2,160,235,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025: $2,261,769,000,000.

SEC. 102. SOCIAL SECURITY.

(a) Social Security Revenues.—For purposes of Senate enforcement under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the amounts of revenues of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016: $_______,000,000 $792,776,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017: $_______,000,000 $824,342,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018: $_______,000,000 $857,154,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019: $_______,000,000 $890,609,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020: $_______,000,000 $925,760,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021: $_______,000,000 $962,188,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022: $_______,000,000 $1,000,637,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023: $_______,000,000 $1,040,394,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024: $_______,000,000 $1,081,476,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025: $_______,000,000 $1,123,748,000,000.

(b) Social Security Outlays.—For purposes of Senate enforcement under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the amounts of outlays of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016: $_______,000,000 $778,032,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017: $_______,000,000 $825,829,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018: $_______,000,000 $882,521,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019: $_______,000,000 $941,034,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020: $_______,000,000 $1,005,632,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021: $_______,000,000 $1,073,227,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022: $_______,000,000 $1,145,188,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023: $_______,000,000 $1,222,754,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024: $_______,000,000 $1,305,622,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025: $_______,000,000 $1,394,327,000,000.

(c) Social Security Administrative Expenses.—In the Senate, the amounts of new budget authority and budget outlays of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund for administrative expenses are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $5,026,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $5,089,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $5,175,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $5,190,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $5,345,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $5,316,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $5,518,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $5,487,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $5,699,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $5,668,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $5,881,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $5,849,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $6,072,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $6,039,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $6,266,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $6,232,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $6,462,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $6,428,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $6,665,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $6,630,000,000.

SEC. 103. POSTAL SERVICE DISCRETIONARY ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.

In the Senate, the amounts of new budget authority and budget outlays of the Postal Service for discretionary administrative expenses are as follows:

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $267,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $266,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $277,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $277,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $288,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $288,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $299,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $298,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $310,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $310,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $321,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $320,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $334,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $333,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $346,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $345,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $358,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $357,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $371,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $370,000,000.

SEC. 104. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

Congress determines and declares that the appropriate levels of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 2016 through 2025 for each major functional category are:

(1) National Defense (050):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $620,263,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $605,189,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $544,506,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $576,934,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $557,744,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $558,049,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $571,019,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $564,685,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $585,310,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $573,614,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $599,627,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $586,038,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $600,634,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $596,103,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $615,997,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $603,051,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $631,771,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $611,920,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $648,836,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $632,992,000,000.

(2) International Affairs (150):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $47,791,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $48,227,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $41,839,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $45,656,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $42,802,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $43,642,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $43,749,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $42,565,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $44,754,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $42,437,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $45,276,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $42,795,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $46,553,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $43,424,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $47,593,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $44,153,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $48,681,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $45,023,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $49,786,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $45,943,000,000.

(3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $30,007,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $30,007,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $30,596,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $30,529,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $31,286,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $31,165,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $31,981,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $31,712,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $32,706,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $32,400,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $33,433,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $33,022,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $34,192,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $33,756,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $34,953,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $34,512,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $35,745,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $35,290,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $36,545,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $36,084,000,000.

(4) Energy (270):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $1,947,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $2,365,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $2,483,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $2,112,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $76,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $731,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $90,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $753,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $128,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $668,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $97,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $543,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $62,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $465,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $36,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $393,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $2,869,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $2,521,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $2,963,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $2,655,000,000.

(5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $36,277,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $38,983,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $36,685,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $38,866,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $37,680,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $38,719,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $39,125,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $39,486,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $41,066,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $41,098,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $40,951,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $41,232,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $41,844,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $41,992,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $43,240,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $43,467,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $44,125,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $43,663,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $45,522,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $44,966,000,000.

(6) Agriculture (350):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $20,628,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $20,585,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $24,247,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $23,696,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $23,204,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $22,471,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $22,083,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $21,401,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $20,974,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $20,498,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $21,078,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $20,613,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $20,914,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $20,476,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $21,506,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $21,051,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $21,620,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $21,125,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $21,834,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $21,416,000,000.

(7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $2,260,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $11,365,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $3,959,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $18,302,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $1,264,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $16,095,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $1,316,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $21,170,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $55,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $20,567,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $75,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $15,388,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $1,341,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $15,789,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $2,452,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $15,942,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $3,648,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $16,051,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $4,520,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $16,011,000,000.

(8) Transportation (400):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $71,528,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $88,436,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $72,392,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $83,756,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $73,286,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $80,329,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $74,077,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $79,437,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $74,826,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $78,935,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $75,549,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $78,708,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $76,221,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $78,973,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $76,840,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $79,228,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $77,506,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $79,123,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $78,208,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $79,426,000,000.

(9) Community and Regional Development (450):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $17,388,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $22,325,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $18,263,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $21,002,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $18,606,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $21,457,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $18,862,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $22,314,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $18,870,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $22,547,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $18,771,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $22,474,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $18,782,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $21,323,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $18,861,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $19,747,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $18,975,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $19,313,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $19,140,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $19,384,000,000.

(10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services (500):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $86,251,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $95,717,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $87,848,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $92,889,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $90,703,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $90,534,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $89,535,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $88,889,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $91,991,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $91,556,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $93,353,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $93,315,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $94,970,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $94,734,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $96,575,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $96,383,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $98,439,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $98,178,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $100,362,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $100,129,000,000.

(11) Health (550):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $414,326,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $424,711,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $385,565,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $389,710,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $388,629,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $390,503,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $402,511,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $403,324,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $425,526,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $415,791,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $433,351,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $433,395,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $452,426,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $452,523,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $471,644,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $471,719,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $489,491,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $489,587,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $512,965,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $513,163,000,000.

(12) Medicare (570):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $567,213,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $567,122,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $562,941,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $562,881,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $562,143,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $562,102,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $619,228,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $619,148,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $657,658,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $657,564,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $698,284,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $698,188,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $776,034,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $775,930,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $787,879,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $787,681,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $797,075,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $796,964,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $902,467,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $902,349,000,000.

(13) Income Security (600):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $529,494,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $528,778,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $458,455,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $455,293,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $466,015,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $458,848,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $460,943,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $457,388,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $471,826,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $467,468,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $481,804,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $477,132,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $493,877,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $493,223,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $502,550,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $498,468,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $512,932,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $504,310,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $521,641,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $517,044,000,000.

(14) Social Security (650):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $33,878,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $33,919,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $36,535,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $36,535,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $39,407,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $39,407,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $42,634,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $42,634,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $46,104,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $46,104,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $49,712,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $49,712,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $53,547,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $53,547,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $57,455,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $57,455,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $61,546,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $61,546,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $65,751,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $65,751,000,000.

(15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $166,708,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $170,152,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $164,905,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $164,449,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $163,101,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $162,477,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $174,989,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $174,175,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $179,899,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $178,942,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $184,172,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $183,222,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $196,530,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $195,502,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $193,156,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $192,124,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $189,999,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $188,884,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $203,895,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $202,761,000,000.

(16) Administration of Justice (750):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $52,543,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $56,757,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $57,030,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $58,576,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $56,787,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $57,929,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $58,512,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $57,973,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $60,284,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $59,888,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $62,239,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $61,690,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $64,815,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $64,224,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $66,745,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $66,238,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $68,717,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $68,091,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $70,550,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $69,922,000,000.

(17) General Government (800):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $23,755,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $23,708,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $24,046,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $23,958,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $24,755,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $24,573,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $25,485,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $25,089,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $26,202,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $25,782,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $26,958,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $26,551,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $27,766,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $27,375,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $28,493,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $28,114,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $29,022,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $28,671,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $29,809,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $29,399,000,000.

(18) Net Interest (900):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $366,579,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $366,579,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $415,132,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $415,132,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $478,693,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $478,693,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $532,670,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $532,670,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $580,522,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $580,522,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $614,725,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $614,725,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $645,841,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $645,841,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $671,301,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $671,301,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $690,987,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $690,987,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $703,419,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $703,419,000,000.

(19) Allowances (920):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $12,271,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $5,520,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, $_______,000,000 $12,975,000,000.

(B) Outlays, $_______,000,000 $2,923,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $10,750,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $14,755,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $15,199,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $16,838,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $46,590,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $44,799,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $54,803,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $51,787,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $98,454,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $80,798,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $112,036,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $101,438,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $90,119,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $83,225,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $250,580,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $234,419,000,000.

(20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):

Fiscal year 2016:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $69,397,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $69,408,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $78,263,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $78,278,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $84,231,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $84,250,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $83,179,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $83,200,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $83,577,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $83,600,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $86,773,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $86,798,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $92,337,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $92,362,000,000.

Fiscal year 2023:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $99,646,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $99,672,000,000.

Fiscal year 2024:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $109,004,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $109,030,000,000.

Fiscal year 2025:

(A) New budget authority, –$_______,000,000 $121,370,000,000.

(B) Outlays, –$_______,000,000 $121,397,000,000.

TITLE II—RECONCILIATION

SEC. 201. RECONCILIATION IN THE SENATE.

(a) Committee on Finance.—The Committee on Finance of the Senate shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction to reduce the deficit by $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

(b) Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions.—The Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions of the Senate shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction to reduce the deficit by $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

(c) Submissions.—In the Senate, not later than July 31, 2015, the Senate Committees named in subsections (a) and (b) shall submit their recommendations to the Committee on the Budget of the Senate. Upon receiving all such recommendations, the Committee on the Budget of the Senate shall report to the Senate a reconciliation bill carrying out all such recommendations without any substantive revision.

TITLE III—RESERVE FUNDS

SEC. 301. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO INCREASE THE PACE OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND PRIVATE SECTOR JOB CREATION IN THE UNITED STATES.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to—

(1) growing the economy;

(2) creating more private sector jobs and enhancing worker rights such as Davis-Bacon reform and card check;

(3) lowering the after-tax costs of investment, savings, and work;

(4) reducing the costs to business and individuals from the Internal Revenue Code of 1986;

(5) reducing the costs borne by economic activity in the United States stemming from Federal regulations, including the costs incurred by individuals in complying with Federal law when starting a business;

(6) reducing the costs of frivolous lawsuits;

(7) creating a more competitive financial sector to support economic growth and job creation while enhancing the credit worthiness of lending institutions; or

(8) improving the ability of policy makers to estimate the economic effects of policy change through the enhanced use of economic models and data in scoring legislation;

without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 302. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO STRENGTHEN AMERICA’S PRIORITIES.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to enhanced funding for national security or domestic discretionary programs by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 303. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROTECT FLEXIBLE AND AFFORDABLE HEALTHCARE CHOICES FOR ALL.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to—

(1) the full repeal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111–148; 124 Stat. 119) and the health care-related provisions of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Public Law 111–152; 124 Stat. 1029); or

(2) the replacing or reforming the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111–148; 124 Stat. 119) or the health care-related provisions of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Public Law 111–152; 124 Stat. 1029);

by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 304. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR IMPROVING ACCESS TO THE CHILDREN’S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAM.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to improving access to affordable health care for low-income children, including the Children’s Health Insurance Program, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 305. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR OTHER HEALTH REFORMS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to—

(1) the requirement to individually purchase, or jointly provide, health insurance;

(2) increasing payments under, or permanently reforming or replacing, Medicare payments for providers;

(3) extending expiring health care provisions;

(4) the health care needs of first responders to domestic acts of terror;

(5) improvements in medical research, innovation and safety; or

(6) strengthening program integrity initiatives to reduce fraud, waste, and abuse in Federal health care programs;

by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 306. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR CHILD WELFARE.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to—

(1) child nutrition programs;

(2) replacing ineffective policies and programs with evidence-based alternative that improve the welfare of vulnerable children; or

(3) policies that protect children from sexual predators in our schools or communities;

without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 307. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR VETERANS AND SERVICEMEMBERS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the improvement of the delivery of benefits and services to veterans and servicemembers, including:

(1) eligibility for both military retired pay and veterans’ disability compensation (concurrent receipt);

(2) the reduction or elimination of the offset between Survivor Benefit Plan annuities and Veterans’ Dependency and Indemnity Compensation;

(3) the improvement of disability benefits or the process of evaluating and adjudicating benefit claims for members of the Armed Forces or veterans;

(4) the infrastructure needs of the Department of Veterans Affairs, including constructing or leasing space, to include leases of major medical facilities, and maintenance of Department facilities;

(5) supporting the transition of servicemembers to the civilian workforce, including by expanding or improving education, job training, and workforce development benefits, or other programs for servicemembers or veterans, which may include streamlining the process associated with Federal and State credentialing requirements;

(6) improving access to and reducing wait times for Department of Veterans Affairs health care, including through hiring medical providers, and improving the quality of such care; or

(7) providing or improving specialty services, including mental health care, homeless services, gender specific health care, fertility treatment, and support for caregivers;

by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

* 1 The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the improvement of the delivery of benefits and services to veterans by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 308. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR TAX REFORM AND ADMINISTRATION.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to—

(1) reforming the Internal Revenue Code of 1986;

(2) amending the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to extend certain expiring tax relief provisions;

(3) innovation and high quality manufacturing jobs, including the repeal of the 2.3 percent excise tax on medical device manufacturers; or

(4) operations and administration of the Department of the Treasury,

by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 309. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO INVEST IN THE INFRASTRUCTURE IN AMERICA.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to Federal investment in the infrastructure of the United States by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation shall not include transfers from other trust funds but may include transfers from the general fund of the Treasury that are offset, provided further that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 310. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR AIR TRANSPORTATION.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to Federal spending on civil air traffic control services, which may include air traffic management at airport towers across the United States or at facilities of the Federal Aviation Administration, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 311. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROMOTE JOBS IN THE UNITED STATES THROUGH INTERNATIONAL TRADE.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to—

(1) suspending or reducing tariffs on miscellaneous imports;

(2) reauthorization of trade related Federal agencies;

(3) implementing international trade agreements;

(4) reauthorizing preference programs; or

(5) enhancing the protection of United States intellectual property rights at the border and abroad;

by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 312. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO INCREASE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISABLED WORKERS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the administration of disability benefits and the improved employment of disabled workers by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 313. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR HIGHER EDUCATION ACT REFORM.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports that amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001 et seq.) by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 314. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR ENERGY LEGISLATION.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to—

(1) reform of the management of civilian and defense nuclear waste;

(2) reform and reauthorization of programs at the Department of Energy related to research and development of alternative or renewable forms of energy, fossil fuel exploration and use, nuclear energy, or the electricity grid;

(3) expansion of North American energy production; or

(4) reform of the permitting and siting processes for energy infrastructure;

without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 315. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO REFORM ENVIRONMENTAL STATUTES.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to reform of environmental statutes to promote job growth by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 316. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR WATER RESOURCES LEGISLATION.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to improving flood control, expanding opportunities for commercial navigation, and improving the environmental restoration of the nation’s waterways without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 317. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND ON MINERAL SECURITY AND MINERAL RIGHTS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to—

(1) reducing reliance on mineral imports; or

(2) the authority to deduct certain amounts from mineral revenues payable to States;

without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 318. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO REFORM THE ABANDONED MINE LANDS PROGRAM.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (30 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.) without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 319. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE FOREST HEALTH.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to—

(1) increasing timber production from Federal lands and providing bridge funding to counties and other units of local government until timber production levels increase;

(2) decreasing forest hazardous fuel loads;

(3) improving stewardship contracting; or

(4) reform of the process of budgeting for wildfire suppression operations;

without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 320. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO REAUTHORIZE FUNDING FOR PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES TO COUNTIES AND OTHER UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to Payments In Lieu of Taxes (PILT) without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 321. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR FINANCIAL REGULATORY SYSTEM REFORM.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to regulatory relief for small financial firms, improvements in the effectiveness of the financial regulatory framework, enhancements in oversight and accountability of the Federal Reserve System, and expansions in access to capital markets without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 322. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE FEDERAL PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to improving the processing of earnings reports for the Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance programs by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 323. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPLEMENT AGREEMENTS WITH FREELY ASSOCIATED STATES.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the implementation of agreements between the United States and nations with whom it maintains a Compact of Free Association without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 324. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROTECT PAYMENTS TO RURAL HOSPITALS AND CREATE SUSTAINABLE ACCESS FOR RURAL COMMUNITIES.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to protecting payments to rural hospitals and creating sustainable access for rural communities, without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 325. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO ENCOURAGE STATE MEDICAID DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS TO PROMOTE INDEPENDENT LIVING AND INTEGRATED WORK FOR THE DISABLED.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to encouraging State Medicaid demonstration programs to promote independent living and integrated work for the disabled, without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 326. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO ALLOW PHARMACISTS TO BE PAID FOR THE PROVISION OF SERVICES UNDER MEDICARE.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to payments to pharmacists for the provision of services under Medicare, without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 327. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE OUR NATION’S COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to supporting and improving community health centers, without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 328. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO THE FUNDING OF INDEPENDENT AGENCIES, WHICH MAY INCLUDE SUBJECTING THE CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU TO THE REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS PROCESS.

** 1 The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the improvement of the delivery of benefits and services to veterans funding of independent agencies, which may include subjecting the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to the regular appropriations process without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 329. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR EXPORT PROMOTION.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to promoting exports, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase total deficits over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 330. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO REFORM, IMPROVE, AND ENHANCE 529 COLLEGE SAVINGS PLANS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to reforms, improvements, and enhancements of 529 college savings plans, without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 331. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO SECURING OVERSEAS DIPLOMATIC FACILITIES OF THE UNITED STATES.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the security of the overseas diplomatic facilities of the United States, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 332. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO ACHIEVE SAVINGS BY HELPING STRUGGLING AMERICANS ON THE ROAD TO PERSONAL AND FINANCIAL INDEPENDENCE.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to welfare legislation to help struggling Americans on the road to personal and financial independence, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 333. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO CONSERVING FEDERAL LAND, ENHANCING ACCESS TO FEDERAL LAND FOR RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES, AND MAKING INVESTMENTS IN COUNTIES AND SCHOOLS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to Federal programs for land and water conservation and acquisition or the preservation, restoration, or protection of public land, oceans, coastal areas, or aquatic ecosystems, making changes to or providing for the reauthorization of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000 (16 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), making changes to or providing for the reauthorization of the payments in lieu of taxes program under chapter 69 of title 31, United States Code, or making changes to or providing for the reauthorization of both laws, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 334. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROTECT TAXPAYERS FROM IDENTITY FRAUD.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports related to changes at the Internal Revenue Service, which may include establishing a process by which taxpayers may (1) receive notification of tax scams and (2) determine whether a return may have been filed using their personal information, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2021 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 335. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to career and technical education, which may include work- or skills-based learning opportunities or which creates rigorous career and technical education curricula in schools, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 336. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO FEMA PREPAREDNESS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to enhancing the preparedness of the Federal Emergency Management Agency to respond to disasters, which may include those on land and in the oceans caused or exacerbated by human-induced climate change, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 337. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO EXPANDING, ENHANCING, OR OTHERWISE IMPROVING SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to expanding, enhancing, or otherwise improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 338. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROMOTE THE NEXT GENERATION OF NIH RESEARCHERS IN THE UNITED STATES.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to policies and programs that improve opportunities for new biomedical researchers by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 339. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROMOTING MANUFACTURING IN THE UNITED STATES.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to investment in the manufacturing sector in the United States, which may include educational or research and development initiatives, public-private partnerships, or other programs, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 340. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROHIBIT ALIENS WITHOUT LEGAL STATUS IN THE UNITED STATES FROM QUALIFYING FOR A REFUNDABLE TAX CREDIT.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to benefits for aliens without legal status in the United States, which may include prohibiting qualification for certain tax benefits without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 341. DEFICIT-REDUCTION RESERVE FUND FOR REPORT ELIMINATION OR MODIFICATION.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating that achieve savings through the elimination, modification, or the reduction in frequency of congressionally mandated reports from Federal agencies, and reduce the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2021 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025. The Chairman may also make adjustments to the Senate’s pay-as-you-go ledger over 6 and 11 years to ensure that the deficit reduction achieved is used for deficit reduction only. The adjustments authorized under this section shall be of the amount of deficit reduction achieved.

SEC. 342. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO ADDRESS HEROIN AND PRESCRIPTION OPIOID ABUSE.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to addressing heroin and prescription opioid abuse, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 343. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO STRENGTHEN OUR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CIVILIAN WORKFORCE.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to strengthening our civilian workforce, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over the period of either the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 344. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REFORM.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to improving Department of Defense financial management, which may include achieving full auditability or eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 345. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE FEDERAL WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT, JOB TRAINING, AND REEMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to reducing inefficient overlap, improving access, and enhancing outcomes with Federal workforce development, job training, and reemployment programs, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase total deficits over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 346. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROVIDE ENERGY ASSISTANCE AND INVEST IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to—

(1) energy efficiency;

(2) the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program; or

(3) Federal programs for land and water conservation, including the Land and Water Conservation Fund;

by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 347. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO ENABLE GREATER COLLABORATION BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS AND LAW SCHOOL CLINICS SERVING VETERANS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the Department of Veterans Affairs collaboration with law school clinics serving veterans, which may include legislation that supports law school clinics that provide veterans with pro-bono legal support and assistance assembling benefits claims, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2021 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 to 2025.

SEC. 348. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO INCREASE FUNDING FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR WASTE CLEANUP.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports related to Federal investments in the Office of Environmental Management, which may include measures to meet the Federal Government’s legacy responsibilities for cleanup of liquid radioactive waste, spent nuclear fuel, transuranic and mixed/low-level waste, or contaminated soil and water, and which may also include measures deactivating and decommissioning excess facilities at 16 nuclear waste sites created by the Manhattan Project and Cold War programs, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 349. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE INITIATIVES TO BOLSTER RESILIENCE OF MISSION-CRITICAL DEPARTMENT INFRASTRUCTURE TO IMPACTS FROM CLIMATE CHANGE AND ASSOCIATED EVENTS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one of more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to Department of Defense initiatives to bolster resilience of mission-critical Department infrastructure to impacts from climate change and associated events, including sea-level rise, flooding, and increased storm surge, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 350. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO END OPERATION CHOKE POINT AND PROTECT THE SECOND AMENDMENT.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the Department of Justice, which may include ending of the Operation Choke Point program, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 351. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PREVENT THE USE OF FEDERAL FUNDS FOR THE BAILOUT OF IMPROVIDENT STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS.

The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to a prohibition, except in the case of Federal assistance provided in response to a natural disaster, on any entity of the Federal Government from providing funds to State and local governments to prevent receivership or to facilitate exit from receivership or to prevent default on its obligations by a State government, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

TITLE IV—BUDGET PROCESS

Subtitle A—Budget Enforcement

SEC. 401. EXTENSION OF ENFORCEMENT OF BUDGETARY POINTS OF ORDER IN THE SENATE.

(a) Extension of Congressional Budget Act of 1974 Points of Order.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Notwithstanding any provision of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.), subsections (c)(2) and (d)(3) of section 904 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 note) shall remain in effect for purposes of Senate enforcement through September 30, 2025.

(2) REPEAL.—In the Senate, section 205 of S. Con. Res. 21 (110th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2008, shall no longer apply.

(b) Other Points of Order.—

(1) PAY-AS-YOU-GO.—Section 201(d) of S. Con. Res. 21 (110th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2008, is repealed.

(2) INCREASING SHORT-TERM DEFICIT.—Section 404(e) of S. Con. Res. 13 (111th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2010, is repealed.

SEC. 402. SENATE POINT OF ORDER AGAINST LEGISLATION INCREASING LONG-TERM DEFICITS.

(a) Congressional Budget Office Analysis of Proposals.—The Director of the Congressional Budget Office shall, to the extent practicable, prepare for each bill and joint resolution reported from committee (except measures within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Appropriations), and amendments thereto, amendments between the Houses in relation thereto, and conference reports thereon, an estimate of whether the measure would cause, relative to current law, a net increase in on-budget deficits in excess of $5,000,000,000 in any of the 4 consecutive 10-year periods beginning with the first fiscal year that is 10 years after the budget year provided for in the most recently adopted concurrent resolution on the budget.

(b) Point of Order.—It shall not be in order in the Senate to consider any bill, joint resolution, amendment, motion, amendment between the Houses, or conference report that would cause a net increase in on-budget deficits in excess of $5,000,000,000 in any of the 4 consecutive 10-year periods described in subsection (a).

(c) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal in the Senate.—

(1) WAIVER.—Subsection (b) may be waived or suspended only by the affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.

(2) APPEAL.—An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under subsection (b).

(d) Limitation.—The provisions of this section shall not apply to any bills, joint resolutions, amendments, motions, amendment between the Houses, or conference reports for which the chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate has made adjustments to the allocations, levels, or limits contained in this resolution pursuant to section 303(1).

(e) Determinations of Budget Levels.—For purposes of this section, the levels of net deficit increases shall be determined on the basis of estimates provided by the Committee on the Budget of the Senate.

(f) Repeal.—In the Senate, section 311 of S. Con. Res. 70 (110th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2009, shall no longer apply.

SEC. 403. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS.

(a) In General.—

(1) POINT OF ORDER.—Except as provided in subsection (b), it shall not be in order in the Senate to consider any bill, joint resolution, motion, amendment, amendment between the Houses, or conference report that would provide an advance appropriation for a discretionary account.

(2) DEFINITION.—In this section, the term “advance appropriation” means any new budget authority provided in a bill or joint resolution making appropriations for fiscal year 2016 that first becomes available for any fiscal year after 2016, or any new budget authority provided in a bill or joint resolution making general appropriations or continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2017, that first becomes available for any fiscal year after 2017.

(b) Exceptions.—Advance appropriations may be provided—

(1) for fiscal years 2017 and 2018 for programs, projects, activities, or accounts identified in the joint explanatory statement of managers accompanying this resolution under the heading “Accounts Identified for Advance Appropriations” in an aggregate amount not to exceed $28,852,000,000 in new budget authority in each year;

(2) for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting; and

(3) for the Department of Veterans Affairs for the Medical Services, Medical Support and Compliance, and Medical Facilities accounts of the Veterans Health Administration.

(c) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal.—

(1) WAIVER.—In the Senate, subsection (a) may be waived or suspended only by an affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.

(2) APPEAL.—An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under subsection (a).

(d) Form of Point of Order.—A point of order under subsection (a) may be raised by a Senator as provided in section 313(e) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 644(e)).

(e) Conference Reports.—When the Senate is considering a conference report on, or an amendment between the Houses in relation to, a bill or joint resolution, upon a point of order being made by any Senator pursuant to this section, and such point of order being sustained, such material contained in such conference report or House amendment shall be stricken, and the Senate shall proceed to consider the question of whether the Senate shall recede from its amendment and concur with a further amendment, or concur in the House amendment with a further amendment, as the case may be, which further amendment shall consist of only that portion of the conference report or House amendment, as the case may be, not so stricken. Any such motion in the Senate shall be debatable. In any case in which such point of order is sustained against a conference report (or Senate amendment derived from such conference report by operation of this subsection), no further amendment shall be in order.

SEC. 404. SUPERMAJORITY ENFORCEMENT OF UNFUNDED MANDATES.

Paragraphs (1) and (2) of section 425(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 658d(a)) shall be subject to the waiver and appeal requirements of subsections (c)(2) and (d)(3), respectively, of section 904 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 note).

SEC. 405. REPEAL OF SENATE POINT OF ORDER AGAINST CERTAIN RECONCILIATION LEGISLATION.

Section 202 of S. Con. Res. 21 (110th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2008, shall no longer apply in the Senate.

SEC. 406. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST CHANGES IN MANDATORY PROGRAMS.

(a) Definition.—In this section, the term “CHIMP” means a provision that—

(1) would have been estimated as affecting direct spending or receipts under section 252 of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 902) (as in effect prior to September 30, 2002) if the provision was included in legislation other than an appropriations bill or joint resolution; and

(2) does not result in a net decrease in outlays over the period of the total of the current year, the budget year, and all fiscal years covered under the most recently adopted concurrent resolution on the budget.

(b) Point of Order.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—In the Senate, it shall not be in order to consider an appropriations bill or joint resolution, or an amendment to, conference report on, or amendment between the Houses in relation to such a bill or joint resolution, that contains a CHIMP that, if enacted, would cause the total budget authority of all such CHIMPs enacted in relation to a fiscal year to be more than the amount specified in paragraph (2).

(2) AMOUNT.—The amount specified in this paragraph is—

(A) for fiscal year 2016, $19,000,000,000;

(B) for fiscal year 2017, $16,000,000,000;

(C) for fiscal year 2018, $12,000,000,000;

(D) for fiscal year 2019, $8,000,000,000;

(E) for fiscal year 2020, $4,000,000,000; and

(F) for fiscal year 2021, and each fiscal year thereafter, $0.

(c) Determination.—The determination of whether a provision is subject to a point of order under subsection (b) shall be made by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate.

(d) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal.—Subsection (b) may be waived or suspended in the Senate only by an affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn. An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under subsection (b).

(e) Repeal.—In the Senate, section 314 of S. Con. Res. 70 (110th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2009, shall no longer apply.

SEC. 407. PROHIBITION ON AGREEING TO LEGISLATION WITHOUT A SCORE.

(a) In General.—In the Senate, it shall not be in order to vote on passage of matter that requires an estimate described in section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 653), unless such estimate was made publicly available on the website of the Congressional Budget Office not later than 28 hours before the time the vote commences.

(b) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal.—

(1) WAIVER.—In the Senate, subsection (a) may be waived or suspended only by an affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.

(2) APPEAL.—An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under subsection (a).

SEC. 408. PROTECTING THE SAVINGS IN REPORTED RECONCILIATION BILLS.

In the Senate, section 310(d)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 641(d)(1)) shall apply and may be waived in accordance with the procedures applicable to a point of order raised under section 310(d)(2) of such Act.

SEC. 409. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST EXCEEDING FUNDS DESIGNATED FOR OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS.

(a) Point of Order.—It shall not be in order in the Senate to consider a provision in any bill, joint resolution, amendment, motion, amendment between the Houses, or conference report that designates for overseas contingency operations, in accordance with section 251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 901(b)(2)(A)), funds that would cause the total amount of funds designated for overseas contingency operations for fiscal year 2016 to be more than $57,997,000,000.

operations—

(1) for fiscal year 2016, to be more than $57,997,000,000; or

(2) for fiscal year 2017, to be more than $59,500,000,000.

(b) Determination.—The determination of whether a provision is subject to a point of order under this section shall be made by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate.

(c) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal.—This section may be waived or suspended in the Senate only by an affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn. An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under this section.

(d) Form of Point of Order.—A point of order under this section may be raised by a Senator as provided in section 313(e) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 644(e)).

(e) Conference Reports.—When the Senate is considering a conference report on, or an amendment between the Houses in relation to, a bill or joint resolution, upon a point of order being made by any Senator under this section, and such point of order being sustained, such material contained in such conference report or amendment shall be stricken, and the Senate shall proceed to consider the question of whether the Senate shall recede from its amendment and concur with a further amendment, or concur in the House amendment with a further amendment, as the case may be, which further amendment shall consist of only that portion of the conference report or House amendment, as the case may be, not so stricken. Any such motion shall be debatable. In any case in which such point of order is sustained against a conference report (or Senate amendment derived from such conference report by operation of this subsection), no further amendment shall be in order.

SEC. 410. SENATE POINT OF ORDER AGAINST PROVISIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS LEGISLATION THAT CONSTITUTE CHANGES IN MANDATORY PROGRAMS AFFECTING THE CRIME VICTIMS FUND.

(a) In General.—In the Senate, it shall not be in order to consider any appropriations legislation, including any amendment thereto, motion in relation thereto, or conference report thereon, that includes any provision or provisions affecting the Crime Victims Fund, as defined by section 1402 of the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (42 U.S.C. 10601), which constitutes a change in a mandatory program that would have been estimated as affecting direct spending or receipts under section 252 of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (as in effect prior to September 30, 2002) were they included in legislation other than appropriations legislation. A point of order pursuant to this section shall be raised against such provision or provisions as described in subsections (d) and (e).

(b) Determination.—The determination of whether a provision is subject to a point of order pursuant to this section shall be made by the Committee on the Budget of the Senate.

(c) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal.—This section may be waived or suspended in the Senate only by an affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn. An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under this section.

(d) General Point of Order.—It shall be in order for a Senator to raise a single point of order that several provisions of a bill, resolution, amendment, motion, or conference report violate this section. The Presiding Officer may sustain the point of order as to some or all of the provisions against which the Senator raised the point of order. If the Presiding Officer so sustains the point of order as to some of the provisions (including provisions of an amendment, motion, or conference report) against which the Senator raised the point of order, then only those provisions (including provision of an amendment, motion, or conference report) against which the Presiding Officer sustains the point of order shall be deemed stricken pursuant to this section. Before the Presiding Officer rules on such a point of order, any Senator may move to waive such a point of order as it applies to some or all of the provisions against which the point of order was raised. Such a motion to waive is amendable in accordance with rules and precedents of the Senate. After the Presiding Officer rules on such a point of order, any Senator may appeal the ruling of the Presiding Officer on such a point of order as it applies to some or all of the provisions on which the Presiding Officer ruled.

(e) Form of the Point of Order.—When the Senate is considering a conference report on, or an amendment between the Houses in relation to, a bill or joint resolution, upon a point of order being made by any Senator under pursuant to this section, and such point of order being sustained, such material contained in such conference report or amendment shall be stricken, and the Senate shall proceed to consider the question of whether the Senate shall recede from its amendment and concur with a further amendment, or concur in the House amendment with a further amendment, as the case may be, which further amendment shall consist of only that portion of the conference report or House amendment, as the case may be, not so stricken. Any such motion shall be debatable. In any case in which such point of order is sustained against a conference report (or Senate amendment derived from such conference report by operation of this subsection), no further amendment shall be in order.

SEC. 410 411. ACCURACY IN BUDGET ENFORCEMENT.

(a) Timing Shifts.—

(1) DEFINITION.—In this subsection, the term “timing shift” means—

(A) a delay of the date on which outlays flowing from direct spending would otherwise occur from 1 fiscal year to the next fiscal year; or

(B) an acceleration of the date on which revenues would otherwise occur from 1 fiscal year to the previous fiscal year.

(2) SCORING.—In the Senate, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget shall not count timing shifts in estimating the budgetary effects of a bill, joint resolution, motion, amendment, amendment between the Houses, or conference report for purposes of enforcing—

(A) the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.);

(B) any allocation, aggregate, or level under a concurrent resolution on the budget; or

(C) any written statement submitted for printing in the Congressional Record by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate that establishes allocations, aggregates, and levels for purposes of enforcing the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

(b) Prohibition of Rescissions That Don’t Save Money.—In the Senate, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget shall not count any rescission of budget authority or contract authority that does not have an effect on outlays in estimating the changes in budget authority, outlays, or revenues of a bill, joint resolution, motion, amendment, amendment between the Houses, or conference report for purposes of enforcing—

(1) the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.);

(2) any allocation, aggregate, or level under a concurrent resolution on the budget; or

(3) any written statement submitted for printing in the Congressional Record by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate that establishes allocations, aggregates, and levels for purposes of enforcing the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

SEC. 411 412. FAIR VALUE ESTIMATES.

Any estimate prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office for a bill, joint, resolution, motion, amendment, amendment between the Houses, or conference report under the terms of title V of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 661 et seq.), shall include, when practicable, an additional estimate of the cost, measured on a fair value basis, of changes that would affect the amount or terms of new Federal loans or loan guarantees or of modifications to existing Federal loans or loan guarantees arising from the bill, joint resolution, motion, amendment, amendment between the Houses, or conference report.

SEC. 412 413. HONEST ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES.

(a) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) BUDGET.—The term “budget” means means—

(A) a concurrent resolution on the budget; or

(B) a written statement submitted for printing in the Congressional Record by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate that establishes allocations, aggregates, and levels for purposes of enforcing the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

(2) BUDGETARY EFFECTS.—The term “budgetary effects” means changes in budget authority, outlays, or revenues.

(3) MAJOR LEGISLATION.—

(A) DEFINITION.—The term “major legislation” means any bill, resolution, conference report, or treaty—

(i) for which an estimate is prepared under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 653) that indicates that not less than 1 of the amounts described in subparagraph (B), before incorporating macroeconomic effects, is greater than $15,000,000,000 in any fiscal year of the estimate; or

(ii) designated as major legislation by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate or the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives.

(B) AMOUNTS.—The amounts described in this subparagraph are—

(i) the sum of the individual positive changes in budgetary effects, not including timing shifts, resulting from such measure; and

(ii) the sum of the absolute value of the individual negative budgetary effects, not including timing shifts, resulting from such measure.

(4) TIMING SHIFTS.—The term “timing shifts” means—

(A) a delay of the date on which outlays flowing from direct spending would otherwise occur from one fiscal year to the next fiscal year; or

(B) an acceleration of the date on which revenues would otherwise occur from one fiscal year to the next fiscal year.

(b) Requirement for CBO Estimates.—An estimate provided by the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 653) for any major legislation shall provide, in addition to the estimate of budgetary effects without macroeconomic effects, an estimate of the budgetary effects from changes in economic output, employment, interest rates, capital stock, and other macroeconomic variables resulting from the major legislation. The total budgetary effects shall delineate between revenue and outlay effects.

(c) Requirement for JCT Estimates.—An Estimates.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—An estimate provided by the Joint Committee on Taxation to the Director of the Congressional Budget Office under section 201(f) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 601(f)) for any major legislation shall provide, in addition to the estimate of budgetary effects without macroeconomic effects, an estimate of the budgetary effects from changes in economic output, employment, capital stock, interest rates, and other macroeconomic variables resulting from the major legislation. The an estimate of the distributional effects across income categories resulting from major legislation.

(2) DELINEATION.—The total budgetary effects shall delineate between revenue and outlay effects.

(d) Contents of Estimates.—An estimate required to be provided under subsection (b) or (c) shall include—

(1) a qualitative assessment of the budgetary effects (including macroeconomic variables described in subsections (b) and (c)) of the major legislation in the 20-fiscal year period beginning after the last fiscal year of the most recently adopted budget that sets forth appropriate levels required under section 301 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 632); and

(2) an identification of the assumptions and the source of data underlying the estimate.

SEC. 413 414. CURRENCY MODERNIZATION.

In the Senate, for purposes of enforcing the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.), any allocation, aggregate, or level under a concurrent resolution on the budget, or any written statement submitted for printing in the Congressional Record by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate that establishes allocations, aggregates, and levels for purposes of enforcing the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, any estimate of the changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues of a provision in a bill, joint resolution, motion, amendment, amendment between the Houses, or conference report relating to a transition from the $1 note to a $1 coin shall—

(1) record the changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues of the provision in the first year in which the provision takes effect;

(2) determine the changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues of the provision based on a net present value estimate of the changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues of the provision over a 30-year period; and

(3) incorporate the changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues of the provision due to behavioral changes.

SEC. 414 415. CERTAIN ENERGY CONTRACTS.

(a) Definition.—In this section, the term “covered energy savings contract” means—

(1) an energy savings performance contract authorized under section 801 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 8287); and

(2) a utility energy service contract, as described in the Office of Management and Budget Memorandum on Federal use of energy savings performance contracting, dated July 25, 1998 (M-98-13)(M–98–13), and the Office of Management and Budget Memorandum on the Federal use of energy saving performance contracts and utility energy service contracts, dated September 28, 2012 (M-12-21)(M–12–21), or any successor to either memorandum.

(b) Estimates.—In the Senate, for purposes of enforcing any point of order established under the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.) or any concurrent resolution on the budget, any estimate by the Congressional Budget Office of the changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues of a provision in a bill, joint resolution, amendment, conference report, or amendment between the Houses modifying the authority to enter, the scope or terms of, or the use of covered energy savings contracts shall—

(1) record in the first year in which the authority would become effective, the changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues (as estimated in accordance with paragraph (2)) of any modifications to the authority to enter the covered energy savings contracts;

(2) in estimating the changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues of the legislation, calculate the costs and savings arising from covered contracts on a net present value basis by adding market risk over the useful life of the services or product to the discount rate in section 502(5)(E) of the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990 (2 U.S.C. 661a(5)(E)); and

(3) classify the effects of the provision to be changes in spending subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) Rule of Construction.—Nothing in subsection (b) shall be construed to modify the methodology for estimating the changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues of a provision that does not relate to covered energy savings contracts in a bill, joint resolution, amendment, conference report, or amendment between the Houses that contains a provision described in subsection (b).

SEC. 416. LONG-TERM SCORING.

(a) Scoring of Legislation Increasing the Discretionary Spending Caps.—An estimate provided by the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 653) for any bill, resolution, amendment between the Houses, or conference report that increases the discretionary spending limits under section 251(c) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 901(c)) shall provide, in addition to the estimate under that section, an estimate of the changes in budget authority, outlays, or revenues under the legislation over the period of fiscal year 2016 through fiscal year 2045.

(b) Scoring of Legislation Relating to the Highway Trust Fund.—An estimate provided by the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 653) for any bill, resolution, amendment between the Houses, or conference report that transfers amounts from the General Fund of the Treasury to the Highway Trust Fund shall provide, in addition to the estimate under that section, an estimate of the changes in budget authority, outlays, or revenues under the legislation over the period of fiscal year 2016 through fiscal year 2045.

SEC. 417. REQUIRING CLEARER REPORTING OF PROJECTED FEDERAL SPENDING AND DEFICITS.

When the Congressional Budget Office releases its annual update to the Budget and Economic Outlook, the Congressional Budget Office shall provide a projection of Federal revenues, outlays, and deficits for the 30-year period beginning with the budget year, expressed in terms of dollars and as a percent of gross domestic product, as part of its annual update required by Public Law 93–344.

SEC. 418. REPORTING ON TAX EXPENDITURES.

The Director of the Congressional Budget Office shall include in the report submitted under section 202(e)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 the following:

(1) An estimate of the cost of tax expenditures as a share of gross domestic product for the budget year and the 9 years following the budget year.

(2) Historical data on the cost of tax expenditures as a share of gross domestic product for each fiscal year beginning with fiscal year 1965 and ending with the budget year.

SEC. 419. CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE ESTIMATES.

(a) Request for Supplemental Estimates.—In the case of any legislative provision to which this section applies, the Congressional Budget Office shall prepare, to the extent practicable, an estimate of the outlay changes during the second and third decade of enactment.

(b) Legislative Provisions to Which This Section Applies.—This section shall apply to any spending legislative provision—

(1) which proposes a change or changes to law that the Congressional Budget Office determines has an outlay impact in excess of 0.25 percent of the gross domestic product of the United States during the first decade or in the tenth year; or

(2) with respect to which the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of either the Senate or the House of Representatives has requested an estimate described in subsection (a).

SEC. 420. TO REQUIRE TRANSPARENT REPORTING ON THE ONGOING COSTS AND SAVINGS TO TAXPAYERS OF OBAMACARE.

When the Congressional Budget Office releases its annual update to the Budget and Economic Outlook, the Congressional Budget Office shall report changes in direct spending and revenue associated with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111–148) and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Public Law 111–152), including the net impact on deficits, including both on-budget and off-budget effects, in its annual update required by Public Law 93–344. The information shall be presented in a format similar to that of table 2 of the Congressional Budget Office’s March 20, 2010 estimate of the budgetary effects of the Health Care and Educational Reconciliation Act of 2010, in combination with the effects of H.R. 3590, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), as passed by the Senate.

SEC. 421. PROHIBITING THE USE OF GUARANTEE FEES AS AN OFFSET.

In the Senate, for purposes of determining budgetary impacts to evaluate points of order under the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, this resolution, any previous budget resolution, and any subsequent budget resolution, provisions contained in any bill, resolution, amendment, motion, or conference report that increases or extends the increase of, any guarantee fees of the Federal National Mortgage Association and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation shall not be scored with respect to the level of budget authority, outlays, or revenues contained in such legislation.

Subtitle B—Other Provisions

SEC. 431. OVERSIGHT OF GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE.

In the Senate, all committees are directed to review programs and tax expenditures within their jurisdiction to identify waste, fraud, abuse or duplication, and increase the use of performance data to inform committee work. Committees are also directed to review the matters for congressional consideration identified on the Government Accountability Office’s High Risk list and the annual report to reduce program duplication. Based on these oversight efforts and performance reviews of programs within their jurisdiction, committees are directed to include recommendations for improved governmental performance in their annual views and estimates reports required under section 301(d) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 632(d)) to the Committees on the Budget.

SEC. 432. BUDGETARY TREATMENT OF CERTAIN DISCRETIONARY ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.

In the Senate, notwithstanding section 302(a)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(a)(1)), section 13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 (2 U.S.C. 632 note), and section 2009a of title 39, United States Code, the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on any concurrent resolution on the budget shall include in its allocations under section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to the Committees on Appropriations amounts for the discretionary administrative expenses of the Social Security Administration and of the Postal Service.

SEC. 433. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS AND AGGREGATES.

(a) Application.—Any adjustments of allocations and aggregates made pursuant to this resolution shall—

(1) apply while that measure is under consideration;

(2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure; and

(3) be published in the Congressional Record as soon as practicable.

(b) Effect of Changed Allocations and Aggregates.—Revised allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments shall be considered for the purposes of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.) as allocations and aggregates contained in this resolution.

(c) Budget Committee Determinations.—For purposes of this resolution the levels of new budget authority, outlays, direct spending, new entitlement authority, revenues, deficits, and surpluses for a fiscal year or period of fiscal years shall be determined on the basis of estimates made by the Committee on the Budget of the Senate.

SEC. 434. ADJUSTMENTS TO REFLECT CHANGES IN CONCEPTS AND DEFINITIONS.

Upon the enactment of a bill or joint resolution providing for a change in concepts or definitions, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may make adjustments to the levels and allocations in this resolution in accordance with section 251(b) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 901(b)).

SEC. 435. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

Congress adopts the provisions of this title—

(1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the Senate, and as such they shall be considered as part of the rules of the Senate and such rules shall supersede other rules only to the extent that they are inconsistent with such other rules; and

(2) with full recognition of the constitutional right of the Senate to change those rules at any time, in the same manner, and to the same extent as is the case of any other rule of the Senate. Senate.66514

Calendar No. 31

114th CONGRESS

1st Session

S. CON. RES. 11

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

** 2 Title: Setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2016 and setting forth the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2017 through 2025.

March 20, 2015

Placed on the calendar

Mar 21 2015

In Detailed Report, Sen. Sanders Shows How Republican Budget Plan Is Terrible For Families

10-page report kicks off Senate debate on FY16 budget resolution with facts and context for how the Republican version of the budget is littered with bogus savings and pain that would be inflicted on Americans families

ROBIN HOOD IN REVERSE: HOW THE REPUBLICAN BUDGET PLAN

IS A GIFT TO THE BILLIONAIRE CLASS AND WILL HURT

THE MIDDLE CLASS, SENIORS, AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Earlier this week, Senate Republicans laid bare the kind of future they want for America: more tax breaks and corporate welfare for millionaires, billionaires, and large corporations who are already doing phenomenally well – and more pain and suffering for the middle class, working families, and the most vulnerable.

The Senate Republicans’ Fiscal Year 2016 budget plan unveiled Wednesday by Budget Committee Chairman Mike Enzi exemplifies the Robin Hood principle in reverse: Quite simply, it would transfer wealth from the middle class and the poor and give to the rich. It would make savage cuts to important federal investments and shred essential safety net programs while providing enormous tax breaks for our nation’s wealthiest individuals and largest corporations.

The Republican budget would cut non-war, non-defense programs by $4.8 trillion – and all federal funding by $5.8 trillion – over the next decade while not raising even one dime in revenue from the wealthiest among us. This is in addition to the more than $4.5 trillion in deficit reduction we’ve legislated over the 2016-25 budget window since 2010, and it continues the trend of reducing the deficit disproportionately through spending cuts – since 2010, we’ve seen more than $4 in spending cuts for every $1 in new revenue. The Republican budget would bring that ratio to more than $11 in spending cuts for every $1 in new revenue. Worse still, roughly two-thirds of the Republican budget’s cuts to non-defense programs would come from programs that support families and individuals struggling to make ends meet.

By contrast, the Budget Committee’s Democrats and Independents are committed to principles and goals that work for the American people:

1. Creating millions of American jobs and increase wages

2. Protecting Social Security and Medicare from benefit cuts;

3. Making higher education more affordable; and

4. Ensuring the tax code is fair for middle-class families.

At a time of greater income and wealth inequality than at any point since the eve of the Great Depression, the Republican budget would cut programs that children, seniors, the sick, the low-income, and working families desperately rely upon.

Many of the Republicans’ cuts are left intentionally vague – clearly because they do not want to be associated with a budget that eviscerates programs that define who we are as a nation. In fact, some of the Budget Committee’s Republican members have told reporters in recent days that they want their plan to be deliberately vague, allowing them to avoid the criticism that was leveled on the Ryan budget when it was released last Congress. These members don’t want to own a budget that proposes tax reform that would dramatically shift wealth from the middle class to the ultra-rich. And they don’t want to be forced to defend a budget that strips health insurance from tens of millions of Americans, putting working families one illness away from financial collapse.

However, it is clear the Republican budget would do all that and more. The Republican budget released this week would:

• Eliminate health insurance for tens of millions of Americans;

• Transfer wealth from hard-working working- and middle-class taxpayers to millionaires and billionaires;

• Prevent millions of jobs from being created by ignoring needed public investment in physical infrastructure and in education;

• Eviscerate the social safety net;

• Maintain the mindless sequestration spending cuts; and

• Halt our nation’s progress in transitioning to a 21st century energy economy that protects the short- and long-term welfare of our families.

Republicans must take ownership of a budget that claims to achieve balance, but does so regardless of the very real costs to millions of Americans. It is a budget that promotes austerity rather than prosperity – a budget whose burden falls on the backs of working families in order to further reward the wealthiest individuals and largest corporations.

In order to claim that their budget will be balanced in 10 years, Republicans are using budget gimmicks such as:

• Using the Overseas Contingency Operations fund, which falls outside of the budget caps to significantly increase defense spending;

• Masking the true consequences of their policies under the guise of “unallocated” cuts and “government-wide” savings;

• Only achieving their goal of “balance” by using made-up “dynamic” numbers; and

• Dismantling health care reform, but keeping the savings and revenues that support it.

The Republicans took control of the Senate in January claiming a desire to govern. This budget document shows the American people just how the Republicans plan to do that – through draconian cuts to some of America’s most important and essential programs, massive transfers of wealth up the income spectrum, and more benefits to their campaign donors.

Since January, we have promised the American people we would expose what the Republican budget would actually mean for their daily lives. We intend to offer a clear alternative to this plan with amendments that demonstrate who is truly standing up for the middle class, for job creation, and for a better tomorrow.

The Republican Budget Kicks Tens of Millions of Americans off of their Health Insurance

Republicans must not be allowed to reverse the progress we’ve made in ensuring more Americans have the ability to purchase health insurance while also slowing down the rate of health care cost growth. The Republican budget claims savings in health care spending but does so by stripping health insurance from tens of millions of Americans and shifting costs to cash-strapped states and individuals. Specifically, the Republican budget would:

• Strip health insurance from more than 27 million Americans by 2025 who would otherwise be insured because of the Affordable Care Act, which the Republican budget repeals.

• Take from states their rights to expand health care access to lower-income residents through Medicaid, kicking 11 million people off their insurance and preventing millions more from enrolling.

• Renege on federal commitments to Medicaid by removing over $1.2 trillion in funding and leaving states to decide between cutting benefits and raising taxes. Similar Republican proposals in the past took away health insurance from up to 20.5 million people by 2022.

• Fail to prevent a 70 percent funding cut to community health centers that provide care for more than 23 million patients including more than 7 million children and 250,000 identified veterans throughout the nation.

• Fails to fund the National Health Service Corps, which is responsible for bringing doctors and dentists to underserved communities in urban and rural areas.

• Strip a combined total of more than 40 million from access to their health insurance – and raise premiums for millions more.

• Strike the ability of young adults – a group that currently experiences an unemployment rate well over 10 percent – to get health insurance through their parents. 2.3 million young Americans have already taken advantage of this feature of the ACA.

• Reap the benefits $700 billion in Medicare savings – and $1 trillion in revenue from the ACA’s tax increases to pay for the law’s benefits – in order to bring their budget into balance, even as they eliminate all of the ACA’s benefits like free preventive care and protections for individuals with pre-existing conditions.

The Republican Budget Refuses to Address the Unfairness in our Tax Code

In a time of great wealth and income disparity, we must make our tax code more progressive and ensure the wealthiest individuals and corporations among us pay their fair share.

The Senate budget offers no solutions other than a vaguely-worded reserve fund for tax reform that offers no information about what tax rates would be imposed, what tax loopholes would be closed, or any problems that would be solved.

It is unacceptable to most Americans that:

• Hedge fund managers making millions a year pay an effective tax rate lower than that of teachers, firefighters, and nurses. This happens because certain investment is taxed at lower rates than the wages and salaries that most of us earn, and the Congressional Budget Office estimates that two-thirds of the benefits of this break go to the richest one percent of households. Unfortunately, the Senate GOP budget does nothing to address this problem.

• Huge and profitable corporations like General Electric, Verizon, Bank of America, and Citigroup have in recent years paid no federal income taxes. Americans corporations avoid $100 billion each year by claiming their profits are made by shell companies in the Cayman Islands, Bermuda, and other offshore tax havens. Unfortunately, the Republican budget does nothing to solve these problems.

• Despite Republicans’ rhetoric about favoring low tax burdens for America’s families, their budget allows expansions of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit to expire after 2017. This would result in a tax hike for 13 million working families with nearly 25 million children.

The Republican budget does nothing to solve any of these problems that result in a fundamental unfairness in our tax code. Worse still, the Republican budget is completely silent about which – if any – deductions, exemptions, or loopholes it would close. Despite Republicans’ supposed seriousness in reducing the deficit, they remain committed to refusing to raise one dime in new revenue, increasing tax giveaways to the wealthiest individuals and largest corporations.

The Republican Budget Gives Unwarranted Gifts to Big Corporations

The Republican budget also calls for a gutting of our financial regulatory system, and would allow the largest banks and financial institutions to once again put our entire economy at risk. Specifically, the Republican budget would:

• Put the American people at risk of another financial meltdown by deregulating Wall Street. Specifically, the bill would likely require the elimination of Title II of Dodd-Frank, which is the provision authorizing regulators to wind down large financial institutions without costs to taxpayers.

• Put Americans at risk for predatory mortgage lenders, debt collectors, payday lenders, and credit card scams by paving the way to weaken the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

• Reduce our ability to regulate Wall Street by – in all likelihood – not meeting the President’s request for the Commodities Futures Trading Commission. This is the regulator tasked with overseeing the $700 trillion derivatives marketplace.

The Republican Budget Slashes Investments in Our Future

While we have made some progress in reducing unemployment, if we count people who are underemployed or discouraged from looking for work, the real unemployment rate remains at a stubbornly high 11 percent.

We still need to create millions of decent paying jobs, and the fastest way to do that is to rebuild our crumbling infrastructure – roads, bridges, dams, levees, water systems, waste water plants, airports, and rail systems.

While Republicans are committed to doubling down on the failed policy of austerity – a policy for which the IMF has apologized for advocating – they simply ignore the necessity for our country to plan for tomorrow by making necessary public investments.

• The Congressional Budget Office has concluded that public investment for non-defense purposes “contributes to the economy on an ongoing basis by improving the private sector’s ability to invent, produce, and distribute goods and services.”

• CBO lists three categories of public investment: physical capital, research and development, and education and training.

• Nearly all such investment takes place through discretionary spending. However, investment has gradually declined as a proportion of discretionary spending, and discretionary spending as a whole has fallen as a share of total federal spending.

• Increasing funding for public investment is a win-win – creating jobs today and making critical improvements to the nation’s infrastructure and workforce.

And while the Republican budget drastically underfunds physical infrastructure today, it also makes thoughtless cuts to the workforce of tomorrow. These include:

• A 31 percent cut in total Pell Grant funding – In the 2014-15 school year, nearly 8 million Americans depend on Pell Grants to help with the cost of attending college.

• Cuts to Head Start which would eliminate 110,000 children from the program over 10 years. The Head Start program has an oft-cited benefit-cost ratio of 7-to-1 – every $1 invested in the program yields the economy $7 in return; under its eligibility requirements, at least 90 percent of the children who are enrolled in each Head Start program must be from low-income families. The Republican budget, combined with sequestration cuts, would result in up to 620,000 children being cut from Head Start over 10 years.

• Switching to Fair Value accounting (i.e. added-cost accounting) which would make student loans appear vastly more expensive to the federal government than they are – $223 billion more expensive from this year through 2024. The Republican budget uses this change as an excuse to dramatically increase college costs by more than 15 percent for struggling students and reduce the availability of loans students rely on to finance their degree.

The Republican Budget Ignores Struggling Families and the Elderly

In the midst of the obscene level of wealth and income inequality that we are experiencing, the United States has by far the highest rate of childhood poverty of every major country on earth. Close to 20 percent of our children live in poverty and about 1 out of 4 kids live with food insecurity. There are schools throughout America where the one good meal a child receives is through the federal school lunch program. As a result of our high poverty, over half of our public school students today qualify for the school lunch program.

In cutting non-defense discretionary funding by more than $37 billion below what President Obama called for, the Republican budget would simply gut federal support programs for low-income households. Budget Committee staff worked to distribute the portions of Republicans’ proposed cuts that were unspecified and compared these draconian cuts with our adjusted baseline. The Republicans’ proposed cuts to programs that support the most vulnerable include:

• A 15 percent cut in the following programs:

o Public Housing

o Housing for Persons with Disabilities

o Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) – in an average year, these cuts that would leave 1.2 million people out of the program entirely.

o Commodity Assistance Program

o Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) – In 2008, the average LIHEAP benefit was $293 a year. Just 16 percent of households eligible for the Heating and Winter Crisis Assistance portion of benefits – which are, in many states, awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis – received assistance.

? Under the Republican budget, in an average year, nearly 900,000 families will be kicked off LIHEAP, benefits would be cut 12 percent, or some combination of the two. That’s beyond the already annual 420,000 families kicked off the program – or a 5 percent benefit cut – due to sequestration cuts.

o Project- and Tenant-Based Rental Assistance – Housing Choice Vouchers help 2 million low-income families rent units on the private market, and keep 1 million Americans out of poverty. In an average year under the Republican budget, nearly half a million families would be kicked off of the Section 8 program – and out of their homes. That’s beyond the over 200,000 families effectively evicted because of sequestration.

• A 33 percent cut in the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).

• An enormous cut – up to $660 billion over 10 years – on programs that support low-income individuals and families. While these cuts explicitly include reductions to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamps) and child nutrition programs, the Republican budget hides their potentially drastic policy changes by providing no details on how these cuts would be achieved.

o In 2011, according to the USDA, 83 percent of households receiving SNAP benefits lived in poverty; 39 percent had zero net monthly income; and 83 percent of benefits went to households that included a child, an elderly person, or a disabled person.

o SNAP benefits, at just $1.42 per meal, are hardly lavish.

o In general, block-granting safety net programs is a surefire way to squeeze their budgets.

The Republican Budget Unleashes More Painful Austerity on the Middle Class

This is no time to return to the failed trickle-down economics of the past that led to the worst fiscal contraction in our lifetimes. One reason for 2014’s good economic performance – 2014 was the best year for job growth since the 1990s – was that replacing most of the sequestration cuts enabled government spending cuts to stop dragging on growth as much as they did in 2013. However, the Republican budget shows their party’s continued commitment to the budget austerity known as “sequestration.”

For Republicans, allowing the sequestration cuts to take place as scheduled would be an exercise in intentional amnesia. In 2013, when sequestration cuts took effect:

• Rental assistance was threatened for 140,000 families.

• The Meals on Wheels Association of America estimated the cut to Meals on Wheels would eliminate the delivery of 19 million meals to seniors.

• Head Start eliminated services to 57,000 children.

• NASA missions were threatened with delay.

• Schools on Native American reservations and military bases deferred building maintenance; some were closed or consolidated.

• The FBI furloughed 36,000 employees and reduced its workforce by 3,500.

• More than 650,000 Defense Department staffers were forced to take up to 11 days of unpaid leave.

• Every state experienced pain, ranging from “canceled festivals to shuttered Head Start programs to massive layoffs.”

• In 2013, CBO projected that if the cuts stayed in place through 2014, they would cost a total of 1.6 million jobs.

Unlike 2013 when funding for veterans medical programs was exempted from sequestration’s harsh across-the-board cuts, the veterans healthcare system has no such exemption from discretionary cuts going forward. The ability of Congress to maintain funding necessary to meet the unique healthcare needs of veterans will be compromised if these cuts are not reversed.

In fact, the Republican budget goes even further in cutting domestic funding by including limitations on the ability of the Appropriations Committee to reduce mandatory spending to offset higher-priority discretionary spending programs. This rule change ends a long-standing practice that pre-dates the statutory caps enacted in 2011. This limitation phases out this practice, resulting in a $19 billion cut by 2021 or roughly 3 percent below that year’s post-sequester level of non-defense funding.

The Republican Budget Provides No Assurance of Reforming Defense Funding

The Republican budget lays the groundwork for an increase in defense funding. Before we can even have a conversation about whether to increase spending at the Pentagon, it is essential we look at billions of dollars in waste, fraud, abuse, and cost overruns at the Department of Defense, including:

• While GAO has identified over 100 needed reforms at the Defense Department to increase efficiency and reduce waste, only a third of these proposed reforms have been fully implemented.

• $457 billion in cost overruns have been added to the Department of Defense’s $1.4 trillion acquisition portfolio, according to GAO. That’s $457 billion resulting from cost growth above the original contractor estimates.

• Eight of the largest defense contractors in the United States have paid billions of dollars in fines and settlements for misconduct and fraud over the past two decades while raking in hundreds of billions of dollars in government contracts over the same time period.

• While the rest of the federal government is able to pass an audit, DOD remains the only department unable to do so. That means it can’t accurately account for its income and receipts.

The Republican Budget Reverses Progress Moving Our Nation to Cleaner and More Sustainable Energy

We know that climate change is real, that we are already experiencing its impacts, and that we must change the way that we produce and use energy if we are to avert its most devastating consequences. We have an obligation to our children and grandchildren to transition away from polluting forms of energy and towards more sustainable fuels. Doing so will improve the health of our families, lower our energy bills, and help avert the potentially catastrophic damages we face from the impacts of climate change. But we also have the opportunity for American workers to lead the world in making the new clean energy technologies that will be part of that transition.

But instead of moving us further along that transition, the Republican budget would continue their party’s polluter welfare programs that protect the financial interests of coal and oil companies at the expense of the health and welfare of our children and grandchildren.

The Republican budget would:

• Block efforts to ensure that taxpayers get a fair return from the development of energy resources owned by the American people, while slashing funding for programs that save middle-class consumers money on their energy bills and at the pump.

• Continue to shower the oil industry with tens of billions of dollars in wasteful subsidies and carve-outs, while ending tax credits for energy efficiency and renewable energy that lower our energy bills and makes us more energy-secure.

• Let polluters off the hook for cleaning up the messes they create by paving the way to weaken health protections for air, water, toxic chemicals, and a host of other public health protection for our children and families, and in the process leaving ordinary Americans and taxpayers to bear those costs.

• Continue to deny the reality of climate change by halting the critical investments we need to make to protect families, communities, and taxpayers from its impacts, including extreme storms, droughts, and sea level rise.

• Hand over America’s public lands and waters to oil, coal, and timber interests for more drilling, mining, and logging, while standing in the way of efforts to preserve and enhance the enjoyment of these public natural treasures for all Americans.

The Republican Budget Does Nothing to Increase the Wages of Working Families

Not only does the Republican budget eviscerate the social safety net, their plan includes nothing to increase the income of ordinary Americans who are working longer hours for lower wages.

• The Republican budget holds tight to their party’s steadfast refusal to lift the minimum wage. Raising the minimum wage to at least $10.10 an hour would reduce government spending on income-support programs by more than $7 billion a year.

• And despite widespread fears, two huge employers of minimum-wage workers – Target and Walmart – are both on record stating that the minimum wage hikes we saw in 20 states earlier this month would lead to neither staff cuts nor price hikes.

• The Republican budget does nothing to address the fact that workers can simultaneously earn a poverty-level wage and yet make too much to receive time-and-a-half for overtime work.

• Over the last century, the decline in union membership has mirrored the income gains of the top 10 percent of the income distribution – and yet the Republican budget does nothing to rebalance bargaining power between employees and employers.

• Paid sick days, already a feature of most well-paying jobs, would be a boon for low-wage workers. Instead, the Republican budget does nothing to ensure more Americans can benefit from paid sick days.

• While women still earn less than men for performing the exact same jobs, the Republican budget is silent on the pressing issue of pay equity.

Conclusion

The Republican budget represents priorities very different from those of most Americans. Balancing the budget on the backs of the most vulnerable among us while giving tax breaks to millionaires and billionaires, as the Republicans do, is simply unacceptable. While we will fight for a budget that creates millions of American jobs and increases wages, protects Social Security and Medicare from benefits cuts, makes higher education more affordable, and implements a tax code that is fair for the middle class, the Republican budget stands in stark contrast to these national priorities.

Appendix

Jen Kimmich, co-owner of the Alchemist Brewery in Waterbury, Vermont

 

My husband and I run a small, successful brewery in the state of Vermont where we employ 24 hard working individuals.  Last year, our company grossed nearly $10M in sales.  These sales, and our impressive net profits, have been great for our company, but also for our local and state economies.  Between manufacturing tax, state retail tax and our corporate income taxes, we are proud to say that we have had a positive impact on our local and state economies.  

 

As a corporation, it is our responsibility to pay our fair share of taxes so that we can continue to improve our infrastructure and work towards improving the lives of our citizens.  We have always played by the rules, and have always paid all local, state and federal taxes without any offshore investments. Why do we, as responsible business owners, pay our fair share of 35% corporate income tax while the largest, and most profitable companies in this country pay an average of 12.6% tax?  It is unbelievable and absolutely unacceptable that an individual in this country, earning $50,000 per year, pays a higher income tax rate than companies earning billions of dollars per year.

 

 

Matt Birong, owner of 3 Squares Café in Vergennes, Vermont

 

My name is Matt Birong and I own 3 Squares Café in Vergennes.  I’ve been in business since 2007.  I employ an average of about 12 people/year, give or take a few depending on the season.  In a small town like Vergennes, I know that my café makes a difference to people’s quality of life and to the connectivity of our community. 

 

As a small business owner, I pay what feels like a lot of taxes: rooms and meals, corporate taxes, unemployment, social security, and withholding taxes  - the list goes on.  It can be hard to absorb the costs, but it’s worth it to me because I know that it’s my contribution to the greater good.  What’s unfortunate is that hugely profitable corporations and private interests pay for DC lobbyists to craft a tax code to reduce or eliminate their tax responsibilities, instead of congress creating a uniform policy that creates an even playing field for small, medium, and large business.  The game is rigged for the upper echelon corporations to navigate their way through complicated tax codes to pay minimal taxes to the gov’t where the rest of us – smaller business owners pay our fair share, but it feels we’re shouldering the burden for those who don’t and meanwhile we just want to make sure we can pay our employees fair wages, help them get health insurance, and provide for retirement. 

 

Joint Statement:

As drafted by Jen Kimmich and seconded by Matt Birong.

 

The Business Roundtable is not a voice for American corporations. This ‘roundtable’ is made up of only 201 businesses.  This is a very small group of socially irresponsible corporations that it seems will do anything to avoid paying their fair share in taxes.  They do not play by the same rules that hard working Americans and responsible corporations across this country do year in and year out.  They avoid paying the taxes that fund education, infrastructure and health care.  

 

The Business Roundtable will tell you that by cutting taxes for these multi-billion dollar corporations, they will create new jobs.  However, we know from history that this is not true.  For instance, between 2008-2012, Verizon had an effective tax rate of -2%. (-2%)!  Meanwhile, they laid off 62,338 employees in the same time period.  During that time period, Tenet Health care had an effective tax rate of -6% and laid off 3,264 employees.  These are just 2 of the many ‘roundtable’ corporations who are avoiding all taxes and seeing huge profits, yet continue to lay off employees.  There is no reinvestment in America- nothing matters to these companies other than profit.  There is no concern for our country’s infrastructure, our children’s education, or the healthcare of our citizens.  There is no concern for the future of social security or medicaid.  There is no concern for the shrinking middle class, the working class or those living in poverty.  These companies are contributing nothing to ensure the success of future generations to come.  And, sickeningly, many of these ‘roundtable’ corporations receive money back, from honest taxpayers, at the end of each year.

 

Americans are angry.  We don’t understand how these big corporations continue to get away with stealing from hard working Americans.  One glaring example is Goldman Sachs.  Even after receiving an $824 Billion taxpayer bailout, they officially held $22.5 Billion in profits offshore in 2014.  I want to know why this is okay when our small companies pay 35% in corporate tax.  Why does my child’s teacher pay a higher tax rate than Goldman Sachs? 

 

This is NOT a partisan issue.  Democrats and Republicans alike are outraged.  Many of our friends and neighboring business owners are Republican and we all agree that this thievery has got to stop.  Legislation that further reduces corporate taxes or continues to allow for offshore tax havens is irresponsible and repulsive.   Legislators who put the interests of these 201 corporations before the interests of our citizens and the future of our country, must to be held to task.  What would the state of our country look like if we all, individuals and corporations alike, paid 0-12% income tax each year?  Conversely, what would it look like if the huge corporations who are avoiding paying taxes now actually paid their fair share?  Hard working Americans do not appreciate having their tax money sent to companies like Verizon at the end of the year who are swimming in profits while they work hard and struggle to get by. 

 

It is the responsibility of our Senators and Congressmen to represent Americans and stand up for our collective financial interests and the future of our country.  Our legislators have a moral responsibility to stand up for the large majority of Americans who work hard, play by the rules and pay taxes.  It is morally wrong to support further legislation that allows these powerful corporations to avoid paying their fair share in taxes.  This is why we are mad- Democrats and Republicans alike.  We need to stop the greed and put the interests of our country first.